City of Turlock, in the Heart of the Valley

turlock 5

Century 21 M&M’s first office was opened in the City of Turlock back in 1994. Today the Turlock office ranks among the top 10 world-wide in the Century 21 system. With over 75 award winning Realtors, Century 21 M&M Turlock is ready to help you with all of your real estate needs, residential and commercial.

The City of Turlock is located in the heart of California’s Central Valley, the second largest city in Stanislaus County with a population of over 69,000 today. Located at the intersection of State Route 99 and State Route 165, Turlock is located South of Modesto and North of Merced, California.

Turlock’s 24 parks provide ample opportunity for  a full range of sports activities. And with the Mother Lode and Sierra Nevada nearby, and the San Francisco Bay area less than 100 miles a way, Turlock is a very pleasant place to live.

With a Mediterranean type climate,Turlock has cool, wet winters with January’s high temperatures average maximum temperature of  53.7 degrees and  low of 38.1 degrees, and hot, dry summers with an average maximum temperature of 94.7 degrees and a minimum of 62.6 degrees. The average annual precipitation is 11.88 inches.

Turlock was founded on December 22, 1871 due to construction of a train station built by the Central Pacific Railroad named after Turlough, in County Mayo, Ireland. For that reason the new railroad town was named Turlock.

While the town grew to be a prosperous center of activity throughout the end of the 19th century, it was not incorporated as the City of Turlock until February 15, 1908. Back then, Turlock was known at the ‘Heart of the Valley’ due to it’s agricultural production, and agriculture remains a major economic force in the region today.

Back in the 1930’s, Turlock was cited by Ripley’s Believe It or Not as having the most churches per capita in the U.S.; mainstream churches – Protestant, Morman and Catholic, alongside various Christian Assyrian churches and Sukh Gurdwaras.

During World War II, after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. Government placed Japanese-Americans into internment camps all over the country. The Stanislaus County Fairgrounds was the site of one of these camps and held over 3,000 interned American citizens.

State Route 99 was completed through the area in 1970, passing to the west of the city mostly through undeveloped land. Since then, the city has grown in that direction to meet the freeway’s north-south path.

The City of Turlock’s top 10 employers are; Turlock Unified School District, Emanuel Medical Center, Foster Farms, CSU Stanislaus, Turlock Irrigation District, Wal-Mart, City of Turlock, Varco Pruden, Mid-Valley Dairy and Sensient.

California State University, Stanislaus, opened to students in 1960, helping spur growth in the city. As of March 2005, CSU Stanislaus reported a student population of 6,192 undergraduate students. The number rises to 7,858 when considering all students, including graduate students.

Turlock is home to two public high schools: Turlock High School and John H. Pitman High School, as well as two continuation high schools: Roselawn High School and John B. Allard High School, which are part of the Turlock Unified School District. Turlock High School, the first in the city, opened in 1907, while Pitman opened in 2002.

Pitman was awarded the California Distinguished School award in 2007, one of only two high schools in the county to receive the award for that year. Turlock Christian High School is a third, private high school within the city. Classes for Turlock Christian High School are held at Monte Vista Chapel, a church in Turlock.

The city of Turlock has one junior high school, one middle school and nine elementary schools. According to California School Ranking, Turlock schools rank between 458 to 807.

So, if you are thinking of moving to Northern California, consider Turlock in the Heart of the Valley with the most number of Churches per capita. Call a Century 21 M&M Realtor today, toll free at 1-800-696-6305, or email turlock@c21mm.com.

***Courtesy of Wikipedia

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s